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Warner Bros. Timeline

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Warner Bros. Studio Founded

1930
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Porky Pig

Porky Pig

The first character to put Warner Bros. animation studio on the map, Porky Pig made his debut in Friz Freleng’s 1935 I Haven’t Got a Hat, as part of an ensemble of schoolroom characters. According to Freleng, “When I was a kid I had two playmates -- a little fat kid called Piggy and his younger brother, who was always called Porky... I always wanted to do a comic strip with two kids with these names. But in animation, everything is animals, so when I had this classroom cartoon, I thought of Porky.” In the 1940s, the mild- mannered Porky was redesigned by Chuck Jones and recast as a hunter, eternally pursuing the daffiest of ducks, Daffy Duck. 

1935
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Daffy Duck

Daffy Duck

Brash, energetic, and out of control, Daffy Duck starred in many of the greatest Warner Bros. cartoons. The character was introduced in 1937 in Porky’s Duck Hunt, a black and white cartoon directed by Tex Avery. Redesigned in the 1940s into a more sophisticated yet equally gooney bird, Daffy is presented as a creature who could do almost anything, except control himself. 

1937
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Bugs Bunny

Bugs Bunny

The cartoon credited as the birth of Bugs Bunny is Tex Avery’s A Wild Hare in 1940. In it, Bugs appears as the perpetually unperturbed and perfectly composed rabbit, insouciantly chewing his carrot and exhausting his antagonists by his wit and indefatigability. Delighting audiences, Bugs became the internationally recognized symbol of the Warner Bros. animation studio. He starred in his own long-running series of more than 160 shorts, and in 1985 became the second cartoon character (after Mickey Mouse) to be given his own star on Hollywood Boulevard. 

1940
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Elmer Fudd

Elmer Fudd

The quintessential wimp, the soft , bald Elmer Fudd is eternally befuddled. Evolving from a short-lived character named Egghead, Elmer first appeared as a naturalist trying to photograph wildlife in the 1940 cartoon Elmer’s Candid Camera. Crying out “Wabbits! Wabbits!,” Elmer starred alongside a developing version of his more famous counterpart, the evasive, carrot-crunching Bugs Bunny. Their subsequent feature released later that same year, A Wild Hare, presented Bugs in his completed form. 

1940
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Tweety and Sylvester

Tweety and Sylvester

Eternal adversaries, the sweet-natured, yellow canary named Tweety and the hungry housecat Sylveste, initially appeared together in 1947 in Tweety Pie, the first of six Warner Bros. cartoons to win an Oscar. Prior to being paired together, both Tweety and Sylvester had starred in a number of cartoons. Tweety was introduced in 1942 in A Tale of Two Kitties as a pinkish baby bird rendered by Bob Clampett before donning his signature yellow feathers. Meanwhile, the scrappy, ever-hungry Sylvester was created by Friz Freleng in 1945. 

1942
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Pepé le Pew, Sylvester, & Yosemite Sam

Pepé le Pew, Sylvester, & Yosemite Sam 1945
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Foghorn Leghorn

Foghorn Leghorn 1946
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Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote

Road Runner & Wile E. Coyote

Using every type of destructive device, from boulders to inventions (always from the ACME Corporation), the indefatigable Wile E. Coyote’s attempts to restrain The Road Runner hilariously misfire again and again, making him the victim of his own machinations. Coyote began chasing the self-absorbed Road Runner in Chuck Jones’ 1949 Fast and Furry-ous. The Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote became one of the most critically lauded of the Warner Bros. cartoon series. In each episode, five variables remain constant. Each chase is set in the dessert of the American Southwest. The Road Runner never leaves the road. There is never any dialogue. Coyote is never injured by The Road Runner, and the audience’s sympathy forever remains with The Road Runner. 

1949
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Speedy Gonzalez

Speedy Gonzalez 1953
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Tasmanian Devil

Tasmanian Devil 1954
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"Classic-era" studio closes

1963